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Page 16: I became a well-known photographer in the US.
At this time of my life, everything is going great. I am in my element.
And I can buy all the cameras I dreamed of.


"Professional Photographers of California", "International Free-lance Photographers Organisation",
"American Press Association", "Professional Photographers of America".




I lived briefly at 319 N Avalon BLVD Wilmington 90744, puis à 2537 D Pacific Coast Highway, suite 444, Torrance CA 90505, tel 1 - 310 375 8229

Richard Avedon : “A photographic portrait is a picture of someone who knows he is being photographed, and what he does with this knowledge is as much a part of the photograph as what he's wearing or how he looks.”

My photography is the love of my life.
Then the Nikon F3.

Here, Helen on a deserted island on a deserted beach, Little San Salvador in the Bahamas.

No I did not choose thoose teeth!


Of course I am French, why do you think I have this outrageous accent for ?
Famous quote from Monty Python.


Pierre Movila :
"A photograph is a heart stopping for a fraction of a second"

Me in 1983 in Cozumel, Mexico, photo by Allan Jones. Trombone loan by Rob Wakefiel. You have to blow the water out of the trombone before you can produce any sound, so it is tough, but it worked and really impressed the local fish.



I’m a photographer. I live in a crazy and fantastic world with unrealistic expectations. Thank you for your understanding.

Me, under the sea in 1983 in Cozumel, Mexico. Photo by Allan Jones. Trombone borrowed from Mr. Wakefiel. You had to blow really hard to get all the water out to make any sound at all. It does work but it is really hard. Well, at least the fish in the area were impressed.


Zabrisky Point, Death Valley, California. Death Valley became my personal photo studio, 2 hours from LA by car. There were totally beautiful spots without a soul in sight. It’s better to stay away in the summer though, as the heat becomes unbearable.

Arches National Park


1982, Missouri, USA . I was able to take this photo thanks to the light breeze making the flowers sway. I used different shutter speeds to get the slight blur in the foreground, and different apertures for the background blur. No Photoshop necessary.

Live Life Happy : Life is like a camera: just focus on what's important and capture the good times, develop from the negatives and if things don't turn out, just take another shot.


 


My painting touch-ups were brought under the limelight thanks to the magazine Canadian Photo Selection.


And also in the magazine Photography Gallery



And also in the magazine: "The British Journal of Photography."


I think one of the things that really separates us from the high primates is that we’re tool builders.
I read a study that measured the efficiency of locomotion for various species on the planet. The condor used the least energy to move a kilometer. And, humans came in with a rather unimpressive showing, about a third of the way down the list. It was not too proud a showing for the crown of creation. So, that didn’t look so good.
But then, somebody at Scientific American had the insight to test the efficiency of locomotion for a man on a bicycle. And, a man on a bicycle, a human on a bicycle, blew the condor away, completely off the top of the charts.

Steve Jobs



Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson.
Steven Paul Jobs (February 24, 1955 – October 5, 2011) was an American business magnate, industrial designer, investor, and media proprietor.
He was the chairman, chief executive officer (CEO), and co-founder of Apple Inc., the chairman and majority shareholder of Pixar,
a member of The Walt Disney Company's board of directors following its acquisition of Pixar, and the founder, chairman, and CEO of NeXT.
Jobs is widely recognized as a pioneer of the personal computer revolution of the 1970s and 1980s, along with Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak.
Jobs was born in San Francisco, California, and put up for adoption. He was raised in the San Francisco Bay Area.
He attended Reed College in 1972 before dropping out that same year, and traveled through India in 1974
seeking enlightenment and studying Zen Buddhism.
Jobs and Wozniak co-founded Apple in 1976 to sell Wozniak's Apple I personal computer.
Together the duo gained fame and wealth a year later with the Apple II, one of the first highly successful mass-produced microcomputers.
Jobs saw the commercial potential of the Xerox Alto in 1979, which was mouse-driven and had a graphical user interface (GUI).
This led to the development of the unsuccessful Apple Lisa in 1983, followed by the breakthrough Macintosh in 1984,
the first mass-produced computer with a GUI. The Macintosh introduced the desktop publishing industry in 1985 with the addition of the Apple LaserWriter,
the first laser printer to feature vector graphics. Jobs was forced out of Apple in 1985 after a long power struggle with the company's board and its then-CEO John Sculley.
That same year, Jobs took a few of Apple's members with him to found NeXT, a computer platform development company
that specialized in computers for higher-education and business markets.
In addition, he helped to develop the visual effects industry when he funded the computer graphics division of George Lucas's Lucasfilm in 1986.
The new company was Pixar, which produced the first 3D computer animated feature film Toy Story (1995).
Apple acquired NeXT in 1997, and Jobs became CEO of his former company within a few months.
He was largely responsible for helping revive Apple, which had been on the verge of bankruptcy.
He worked closely with designer Jony Ive to develop a line of products that had larger cultural ramifications,
beginning in 1997 with the "Think different" advertising campaign and leading to the iMac, iTunes, iTunes Store, Apple Store, iPod, iPhone, App Store,
and the iPad. In 2001, the original Mac OS was replaced with a completely new Mac OS X (now known as macOS), based on NeXT's NeXTSTEP platform,
giving the OS a modern Unix-based foundation for the first time. Jobs was diagnosed with a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in 2003.
He died of respiratory arrest related to the tumor at age 56 on October 5, 2011.

Steve Jobs is the authorized self-titled biography of Steve Jobs. The book was written at the request of Jobs by Walter Isaacson,
a former executive at CNN and TIME who has written best-selling biographies of Benjamin Franklin and Albert Einstein.
Based on more than forty interviews with Jobs conducted over two years—in addition to interviews with more than one hundred family members,
friends, adversaries, competitors, and colleagues—Isaacson was given "unprecedented" access to Jobs's life.
Jobs is said to have encouraged the people interviewed to speak honestly.
Although Jobs cooperated with the book, he asked for no control over its content other than the book's cover, and waived the right to read it before it was published.
The book was released on October 24, 2011, by Simon & Schuster in the United States, 19 days aft




I get my Private Pilot Licence, FAA, in 1982, (validated in France in 1986) in Missouri, to access, among others, the fantastic Alaskan landscapes. Wilderness, here I come. With my camera, of course. I feel ready for "National Geographic".

With the wing above the cockpit, Cessnas are ideal for aerial photography. The 152 is the most popular single engine, two passenger planes in the world. Maximum speed 204 km/h, fix landing gear, fix pitch McCauley propeller, take off maximum weight: 757 kg, flight autonomy 5H, runway take of: 408 m. Here in the small Cessna 152, during my first cross-country solo flight. Weather is bad. I fly below the clouds. I had secured my Nikon F3 and its fish-eye Nikkor lens 16mm F2.8 on a tripod, solidly tapes with gaffer behind the seats. Remote control triggering with the remote attached to the yoke.
I took photos underwater all around the globe. See page 24.


I took photos of glacier climbing in Alaska. See page 26.


Glacier climbing in Alaska. Thank you Barry Moss for introducing me to this sport. He managed to make me overcome my vertigo. I spend 4 summers in Alaska. Here is Mendenhall Glacier, near Juneau. The friend in the middle is Tony.
Shannon Templeton: "And thank you for taking me on my first glacier experience! Those are memories I will never forget."

I go horseback-riding anywhere and everywhere. See page 27.




I got my sailing certifications to get superb photos of cruiseships from sailboats. See page 25.


I did a technical photography internship with Dean Collins and a fashion internship with Jean Paglioso. See page 18



Michèle West at Sans Souci Hotel, near Ocho Rios Jamaica, around 1984. As Andy Novis said: "So delicate, so feminine".








Gwen in Haïti.



Jakarta.


Diving with blue sharks in California in 1992.


Haiti is one of the poorest countries in the world. Haitians are strikingly kind and sincere. We, the rich and arrogant, could learn a thing or two from them.


Cap-Haitien resident in front of his house.





Feb 1984 : Expedition beyond the polar circle in Alaska.




1986-87 : Photo reportage on the Amazon.
Survival suits in Alaska in the summer of 1990.

Tulamben shipwreck, Bali, 1991.




I went to the top of those magnificent towers.
Andy Novis remarked: "Atheists don't fly planes into buildings"
Tenzin Gyatso : "It does not matter if a person is religious or not : what is far more important is that he is good.”



I photographed Petra Lindblad, famous model, in Hollywood, 1993.
White background, protection from intense white reflection with the help of Lightform P22 panels with black screens


Petra was also photographed, among others, by the famous photograph Peter Lindbergh for the magazine Vogue France.
I would later Peter Lindberg later, at his home on rue de Savoie in Paris, to give him introductory courses to computers.











Calvin et Hobbes est une bande dessinée américaine écrite et illustrée par Bill Watterson, qui met en scène les aventures humoristiques de Calvin, un enfant imaginatif de six ans, et de Hobbes, son tigre en peluche sarcastique.
Fin 1995.




Calvin and Hobbes is a daily American comic strip created by cartoonist Bill Watterson
that was syndicated from November 18, 1985 to December 31, 1995. Commonly cited as "the last great newspaper comic",
Calvin and Hobbes has enjoyed broad and enduring popularity, influence, and academic and philosophical interest.
Calvin and Hobbes follows the humorous antics of the title characters: Calvin, a precocious, mischievous
and adventurous six-year-old boy; and Hobbes, his sardonic stuffed tiger.
Set in the contemporary suburban United States, the strip depicts Calvin's frequent flights of fancy and friendship with Hobbes.
It also examines Calvin's relationships with family and classmates, especially the love/hate relationship between him and his classmate Susie Derkins.
Hobbes' dual nature is a defining motif for the strip: to Calvin, Hobbes is a living anthropomorphic tiger,
while all the other characters see Hobbes as an inanimate stuffed toy.
Though the series does not frequently mention specific political figures or contemporary events,
it does explore broad issues like environmentalism, public education, philosophical quandaries and the flaws of opinion polls.
At the height of its popularity, Calvin and Hobbes was featured in over 2,400 newspapers worldwide.
In 2010, reruns of the strip appeared in more than 50 countries, and nearly 45 million copies of the Calvin and Hobbes books had been sold worldwide.

Probably it influenced my passion for soft toys : https://prisedevue.photos/english/chapitres/info_pratique/bio/page81.htm

If you lived in California in the 80s.
California is huge. We have the world's fifth largest economy, surpassed only by the US as a whole, China, Japan, and Germany. California's economy is larger than every other nation on earth. When you hear that we're "failing" and a "shithole," that's political propaganda. Economically, geographically, and demographically, we are one of the most diverse political entities on the planet.
This means that very little you can say about California applies to the state as a whole. Life in San Francisco resembles life in London more than it resembles life in Bakersfield. Part of the beauty and allure of California is that, no matter what you want, we have it. Metropolitan cities are an hour away from rolling farmland, which is an hour away from the desert, which is a few hours away from snow-capped mountains. Get in your car and drive in any direction for a few hours and you'll see six different Californias.
People come here from all over the world, and that's our strength. We are your future--no one race or ethnicity has a majority here, although Latinx people have the plurality, which will soon be true for America as a whole. But even "Latinx" is a category so broad as to be almost meaningless. California was once Mexico, so people of Mexican descent have always had the demographic upper hand, but you can't pick up a square mile of California anywhere without getting Salvadorans and Guatemalans in that mix, along with Syrians, Lebanese, Persians, Ethiopians, people from the Caribbean, Chinese, Filipinx, and so much more. That diversity has always been one of our greatest strengths. You've heard of Sutter's Mill, where gold was first discovered? It's in the town of Coloma, which was almost entirely owned by a family of formerly enslaved Black people. You can still see the son's smithy and several other historic family buildings if you go there, which I recommend that you do! The whole town is basically a California history field trip.
California has always opened her arms to the world, and it's made us stronger, better, wealthier, and more beautiful.
We have nothing but love to give the rest of the United States. Well, that and our significant tax contributions (we pay more to the federal government than we get back), ports, industry, films, and music. Oh, and we produce the most food of any state. But mostly love.
So the next time someone tries to blame grass fires caused by lightning on "bad forest management," or "Gender Reveal Parties" stand up for the Golden State, OK?
Darrin Brenner

 

This is why I spent 12 years in California:

I lived briefly at 319 N Avalon BLVD Wilmington 90744, then àat2537 D Pacific Coast Highway, suite 444, Torrance CA 90505, tel 1 - 310 375 8229


Si vous avez vécu en Californie dans les années 80. La Californie est immense. Nous avons la cinquième économie mondiale, surpassée seulement par les États-Unis dans leur ensemble, la Chine, le Japon et l'Allemagne. L'économie de la Californie est plus grande que toutes les autres nations du monde. Quand vous entendez que nous «échouons» et que nous sommes une «merde», c'est de la propagande politique. Économiquement, géographiquement et démographiquement, nous sommes l'une des entités politiques les plus diversifiées de la planète.
Cela signifie que très peu de choses que vous pouvez dire sur la Californie s'appliquent à l'État dans son ensemble. La vie à San Francisco ressemble plus à la vie à Londres qu'à la vie à Bakersfield. Une partie de la beauté et de l'attrait de la Californie est que, peu importe ce que vous voulez, nous l'avons. Les villes métropolitaines sont à une heure des terres agricoles vallonnées, à une heure du désert, à quelques heures des montagnes enneigées. Montez dans votre voiture et conduisez dans n'importe quelle direction pendant quelques heures et vous verrez six Californies différentes.
Les gens viennent ici de partout dans le monde, et c'est notre force. Nous sommes votre avenir - aucune race ou ethnie n'a de majorité ici, bien que les Latinx aient la pluralité, ce qui sera bientôt vrai pour l'Amérique dans son ensemble. Mais même "Latinx" est une catégorie si large qu'elle n'a presque pas de sens. La Californie était autrefois le Mexique, donc les personnes d'origine mexicaine ont toujours eu le dessus sur le plan démographique, mais vous ne pouvez pas trouver un kilomètre carré de Californie n'importe où sans intégrer les Salvadoriens et les Guatémaltèques, ainsi que les Syriens, les Libanais, les Perses, les Éthiopiens, des gens des Caraïbes, chinois, philippins et bien plus encore. Cette diversité a toujours été l'une de nos plus grandes forces. Vous avez entendu parler du moulin de Sutter, où l'or a été découvert pour la première fois? C'est dans la ville de Coloma, qui appartenait presque entièrement à une famille d'anciens Noirs réduits en esclavage. Vous pouvez toujours voir la forge du fils et plusieurs autres bâtiments historiques familiaux si vous y allez, ce que je vous recommande de faire! La ville entière est essentiellement une excursion sur l'histoire de la Californie.
La Californie a toujours ouvert ses bras au monde et cela nous a rendus plus forts, meilleurs, plus riches et plus beaux.
Nous n'avons que de l'amour à donner au reste des États-Unis. Eh bien, cela et nos importantes contributions fiscales (nous payons plus au gouvernement fédéral que nous n'en récupérons), les ports, l'industrie, les films et la musique. Oh, et nous produisons le plus de nourriture de tous les états. Mais surtout l'amour.
Donc, la prochaine fois que quelqu'un essaiera de blâmer les feux d'herbe causés par la foudre sur la «mauvaise gestion des forêts», ou les «Gender Reveal Parties» défendent le Golden State, d'accord ?
Darrin Brenner

The Golden State

La Californie à elle seule représente un quart de la totalité des brevets déposés aux États-Unis.

Elle a aussi produit : Disneyland, Universal Studios, la Silicon Valley, Apple, Facebook, Hollywood, les universités prestigieuses : Caltech, UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles), Base Edwards, Stanford, Berkeley, l’université de San Francisco ou de San Jose, California Institute of Technology (Richard Feynman), Observatoire du Mont Wilson (Edwin Hubble y a prouvé l'expansion de l'Univers), Palomar Observatory, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Steve jobs, Steve Wozniak, Bill Hewlett et David Packard, Netscape, Synthorx, George Lucas, The Beach Boys, Tim Burton, Joe DiMaggio, Serena Williams, Robert Frost, William Hearst, Sally K. Ride, Johny Depp, Ben Affleck, Clint Eastwood, Leonardo DiCaprio, Robert Redford, Tom Hanks, Robert Duval, Sean Penn, Nicolas Cage, Francis Ford Coppola, John Ford, Gregory Peck, Dustin Hoffman, Kevin Costner, Marilyn Monroe, Ronald Reagan, Fritz Lang, Pierce Brosnan, Shirley Temple, Jennifer Aniston, Gwyneth Paltrow, Angelina Jolie, Jodie Foster, Kate Hudson, Michelle Pfeifer, Cameron Diaz, Dean Collins, etc.

La diversité géographique : La vallée de la Mort, Anza-Borrego Desert, Mappa valley, San Diego, San Francisco, Baie de Monterey, Baie de Santa Monica, Big Sur, Les Channel Islands, Santa Barbara, Le désert des Mojaves, Yosemite, Sequoia Park, Sierra Nevada, Reno, Mont Whitney, Parc national de Joshua Tree, Lac Tahoe, Alcatraz, etc..








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Here are about 620 examples of my photographic event coverage since 1984.
I know, it is monstrous.
This list begins with the compilations: Fashion & Models, Lingerie, Beauty, Makeup & Hair, Portraits, Events, Objects, Archi & Deco, Industry, Press, Celebrities, etc.

There is also a search command, not always up to date, but pretty comprehensive on all my reportages:

My blogs

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